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Thursday, September 30, 2010

Oven Roasted Tomato Sauce

 By Abby of Love Made the Radish Grow
Though there have been no gluts of tomatoes this year, the plants we did get in are doing very well. I canned a bit of diced tomatoes to use for salsa throughout the winter, as we do not like canned salsa. The other big thing we use is sauce for pizza and pasta. I do not like just pureeing tomatoes and trying to get them cooked down and thickened up at the last minute-usually we have pizza or pasta when we are running short on time, so I needed a grab and go sauce. I found a recipe for an oven roasted sauce, and tweaked it a bit to our taste. It turned out beautifully and was very simple.
First, cut up enough tomatoes to generously fill a 9X13 or standard sized rectangular casserole dish. Put some olive oil in the bottom before you toss them in to help them from sticking and add flavor. I used about 1/4 c.  I kept the tomatoes in quarters-anything smaller and it can get very tedious to pick out the skins later. Then I quartered one onion and broke up the cloves of one large head of garlic, though I DID NOT skin them and put all of that on top. I also had a couple sweet peppers in there somewhere just chopped a bit.
Put all of this in a 450 degree oven for 45 minutes, then turn it down to 350 for another hour to two hours. Just watch everything roast. Once the tomatoes are sufficiently cooked down (their insides should squish well and the skins just fall off) and your garlic squeezes right out of the skins, you are done cooking.
Let everything rest on the counter until it cools enough you can handle it. It may take a while. Just cover it up and do something else. Once it is cool, squeeze the garlic out of its skins and remove all the tomatoes skins you find. All those skins will make your sauce bitter. Start moving the veggies to a food processor-it took a couple batches to get everything done.  Once you have pureed everything to a sauce, including all the juices in the bottom of the pan, mix your batches together and season with salt, pepper, oregano, basil and sugar to your taste. Fill jars and process 35 minutes for quarts, at 10 pounds pressure in your pressure canner.

12 comments:

Lena said...

Wow that sounds just so yum!

Erin said...

Do you add any extra acid to your tomatoes when you can them? I have read tomatoes can be tricky because they're right on the edge acidity-wise and can be prone to botulism. I also was told adding oil to canned sauce is not a good idea safety-wise?

I made some sauce similar to this but froze it. I haven't ever canned anything but would like to start. However, the tomato issues make me a little nervous. I wonder if pressure-canning the sauce would be safer?

Abby said...

I used the same ingredients as a ball tomato sauce recipe that had them hot water bathed, so it should be fine. There can be issues with acid in tomatoes, but I use varieties that I know are high in acid-I prefer them taste-wise anyway. If ever I am in doubt I add at least an extra 10 minutes to processing time. Pressure canning would not hurt the sauce, either, if you feel safer doing it that way. Most modern recipes add lemon juice to their sauces, which also would not hurt the flavor any, to compensate for not knowing the acidity of the tomatoes used.

Abby said...

I should add that the oil is there more for keeping the tomatoes from sticking to the bottom of the pan. You can easily leave it out. The amount that ends up in the sauce is rather negligible.

Michelle J said...

This is brilliant! I was just thinking of trying a roasted tomato sauce. Thanks for the info! :)

dixiebelle said...

I have trouble with making pasta sauce, but this sounds easy and delicious.... thank you, looking forward to an abundance of good, tasty tomatoes this year to use!

dixiebelle said...

Oh, and as for the acidity levels, I think you can test with litmus paper, or perhaps some other way, to test before canning/ preserving with tomatoes...

http://www.dummies.com/how-to/content/why-acidity-levels-are-important-when-canning-food.html

Rose said...

That is a great recipe!

Throwback at Trapper Creek said...

I add citric acid to each jar at canning. 1/4 teaspoon per pint, or 1/2 teaspoon per quart. I am always making sauce from a mixture of tomatoes, and even if a variety is supposed to be high or moderate acid, many factors such as soil fertility and irrigation can affect the final product and varies from garden/farm to garden/farm.

A longer processing time or pressure cooking won't make it safer if it is low acid unless you plan to boil your sauce in an open vessel for 15 minutes before tasting as is recommended for all home canned low acid vegetables. Some cooking uses would satisfy the boiling recommendation, and other may not, for instance pizza may not get hot enough to actually cook the sauce thoroughly, whereas pasta sauce could easily be cooked for 15 minutes.

Green Bean said...

Looks utterly amazing!

Anonymous said...

About how much sauce does this make?

Notes From The Frugal Trenches said...

Looks absolutely delicious!! I must try this soon!!