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Tuesday, November 15, 2011

Plan B?

Bel

A friend sent me this link to a video of Ireland's Financial Expert Eddie Hobbs advising people to get out of the Euro as it is going to collapse.  To understand a little more about why this is seeming inevitable, I watched this video.

I'm no economist.  In fact, I barely understand the concepts being discussed in these clips.  But it seems to me that the writing's on the wall...


What is your personal reaction to the current state of our global economy?

Are you moving your money? Using an alternative economy (like LETS)?  Stockpiling?  Growing more food?  Chaging jobs?  Investing in precious metals?  Seems like all of these activities (and more) are no longer the realm of 'preppers' - people everywhere are getting nervous...  I'm keen to hear what other simple, green, frugal folk are thinking, please comment!

9 comments:

risa said...

My partner-in-life and I dropped out in 1975, expecting these things to happen then. We bought twelve acres and cleared land, dug a well, ran the house on twelve volts, planted gardens and fruit trees and raised and butchered animals and worked forestry and forest fires for the grubstake. We raised kids, too.

Time went on, and we re-joined (against our will) the "rat race" as it was called, and now the nest is empty and we're retired, and there's not much left for us to prep for. The kids are not as interested in this world view as we are, but they do know we've kept up a stock of skills, land, flocks and tools for them, just in case.

I would advise 1) retire debt, own land free and clear with your own well 2) get it locally, make it, mend it, repair it, reuse it 3) nurture the soil, grow your food, preserve it, cook it, return it to the earth 4) insulate, set up wood heat and alternative lighting 5) lower expectations as to stylishness and 6) GET TO KNOW AND CHERISH THE NEIGHBORS, regardless of politics.

In other words, live like this blog. :)

SARINA said...

Whatever you can do for yourself to live more independently and self sufficiently will ultimately see you through difficult times. I agree entirely with risa`s comments.

Frugal Living UK said...

As I have no real spare money at the moment it is not so much 'what to do with it'. However, if I had spare money + a mortgage I would be trying hard to pay the mortgage balance off with it rather than save it. It seems the safest thing to do at the moment is to aim towards being completely debt free. On the other hand, if I did have money and no mortgage I would be spreading it very thinly about and making sure I was very up to date on which bank is owned by which bank!

Bel said...

Risa, so succintly described, thank you! What an amazing journey.

Sadge said...

Ditto on the advise in Risa's comment - we've done most of that. Earlier this year, I'd finally had enough of my big bank's fees and dictates, so moved my money over to a local credit union.

Jenni @ RainyDayGardener said...

We have been working on the majority of the suggestions Risa put forth. We are working with our parents to pay off the mortgage of a home for all of us to use. We are greatly expanding our organic vegetable garden, adding fruit trees and expanding the berries we grow. Here in the US, mainstream media is barely covering the European debt crisis. But, my husband and I do not follow mainstream news so we have felt for some time (since 2008) that we need to become more self sufficient and get out of the cycle of consumerism. It just seems like it can't come together soon enough.

Urban Girl said...

Great question! I agree with all the comments - especially the "own land" idea... we bought land in an urban setting so the next steps are to make it as efficient as possible, have alternate heat/energy sources; get to know our neighbours - try and start a community garden; increase mending and crafting skills; try to promote the importance for our city to be as resilient as possible...

We made sure that we could pay the bills on ONE salary so that we could be more flexible in uncertain times.

And expenses like trips overseas or new electronic toys or extravagant items are definitely getting low on our priority list as we look at what we need to do for our house!

I'm also back at school - if I do have to work longer (past "early retirement") I want to enjoy what I'm doing!

FoodMuster said...

The church I belong to has been advising us to be self-sufficient and to have a food store of at least 3 months for decades. I have known this my whole life but started to work on this last year. I have a fairly good food store, its become a bit bare lately, but I am working on replenishing. We got chickens this year, and attempted a vege patch which unfortunately didn't work, but we are trying again! Basically, we are going to be facing a lot of challenges in our lives either globally, locally, or personally. We need to be ready for each of these, the best we can. Save money, even if you put it on your mortgage, you can always redraw if you have to. Store food like wheat, rice, pasta, legumes etc that can keep long term and also work on short term foods. Also store things like toilet paper, toiletries, matches, batteries,First aid kit etc.Basically, the things you don't want to live without. And most importantly,store water! All this can be done over a long or short period of time, whatever your budget allows you to do. But, I can definately recommend this, as the food store comes in handy when the big bills hit! Also my mum did this and it all came in handy when my dad lost his job when we were young. No income and 5 kids to feed! It filled the gap for 2.5months and my mum was greatful she had her food store.

Bel said...

FoodMuster, I have met a few older women who stockpile food - usually 6 months' worth at a time or so, and have stories to tell about way-back-when and how their stockpile got them through this occasion or that. Inspiring stuff, thank you.