Tuesday, 24 March 2015

Dressed simply = simply dressed


As we relaunch the Co-op we thought we'd discuss the everyday matter of clothing, how it fits into our simple living journey, how to be more mindful of reusing, recycling and purchasing our garments.

Have you noticed that when you have too much of something it clouds your mind in the same way as eating too big a meal clouds your digestion? In the pursuit of our simple living goals we may be quick to declutter an unworkable kitchen cupboard, a bathroom cabinet or a pile of paper gathering on the kitchen bench, but what about that area that you face every morning as you begin your day?

A simple wardrobe of clothes that fit you, that suit the tasks and activities you undertake each day, that will stand up to regular washing and the work you do can take you one more step in achieving your goals.


A simple wardrobe will hold clean, folded or hung items that serve you well. For some simple lifers this will include some form of a suit, for others it will be three pairs of jeans and accompanying t-shirts, for others it will be a blend of items across the formality spectrum.

A simple wardrobe won’t include an overstuffed underwear drawer of garments in various stages of dilapidation. It will include a drawer of socks/stockings/tights/long johns suitable for the climate you live in and the work you do each day.

A simple wardrobe will reduce your carbon footprint if it:
  • includes only items that you wear (so they fit and are appropriate) even if some of those items include only the “occasional wear” category; 
  • is planned to curb unnecessary shopping (or making); 
  • is tailored and edited for you thereby reducing the size of the pile to be laundered.
So how do we attain this simple wardrobe? By moving in and decluttering the surplus-to-requirements items, donating those in good condition to your charity of choice and composting those which are too far gone if made of natural fibres. Dress the body that you have today, not the one you are aspiring to in twelve months, dress for the climate that you live in and the work/activities you do. And don’t forget your feet!

Once you have edited your clothing you may be left with a neat rack of clothes on hangers or folded on shelves and in drawers. But what if you find you haven’t made much of a dent? 

There is a wealth of ideas online which suggest practical means for developing an appropriate yet simple wardrobe. Courtney Carver’s popular Project 333 challenges you to live with 33 items for 3 months (a season for many of us). Courtney’s challenge suggests packing away the items not included in your selected 33 which gives you the option to put them back later if you choose.

Capsule wardrobes can, on first glance, look suitable only for the fashion conscious such as the one for women here and the one for men here until you look more closely. A capsule wardrobe is designed to mix and match so a few items will provide you with a range of outfits.

Finally, evaluate what you like to wear. Are comfort, colour, cut priorities? Think a little deeper -- what makes a garment comfortable for you, what colours do you like, what cut (say of jeans) satisfies you the most?

Then, just as you would after clearing out-of-date items from your pantry, make a shopping list to carry with you. It may read something like:
  • pair of jeans (straight cut, navy) 
  • pairs of cotton socks (dark) 
  • pair of cotton pyjamas
This list is your shopping guide, resist buying anything else and/or substituting unless there is a very good reason that meshes with your goals. If it takes three months to save for these or find them so be it. Getting dressed in the morning is about quality over quantity, clothes that fit and maintaining your own look or work uniform. Such a clothing collection would fit in your great grandmother’s bedroom cupboard.